Research Statement of Purpose

In my first year of college, an English professor showed me an idea which she attributed to V.S. Ramachandran's on how people draw two synonyms differently. Ramachandran had people draw the contrast between ecstasy and rapture, which they frequently contrasted as a starburst and a swirl, respectively. The etymological origins of these synonyms are the purported reason for this association, yet this information is not part of the everyday use of these words, or even apparent in a dictionary. Still, as I replicated the findings with friends, it surprised me that proficient English speakers showed a sensitivity to these etymological origins without any capacity to explain why. I theorized that the process by which we all visualized the contrast between these similar abstract concepts was enculturation – the slow exposure to patterns of stimuli that establish the norms, concepts and values of a community. As I progressed through my undergraduate years, I developed an increasing fascination with complex mental representations that could not be acquired with one trial learning – what are the cognitive requirements and experiences necessary to correctly associate two abstract synonyms, on tasks like the "analogies" section of the SATs?

I do not yet have a word for this type of thinking, but for now I will refer to it as symbolic, pattern-based decision making. I see an undefined space for calculations in the mind, and to understand this space is to understand an important aspect of more complex thinking that will have important applications in education. For now, I will describe it as a "space" based on implicit memory where cultural and linguistic constructs are formed by the mind's extraction of patterns from repeated exposures to complex stimuli. These patterns may or may not be accessible to conscious thought and yet we are able to draw on these patterns to make decisions which represent some cohesive mental representations and are consistent across tasks. The experiences that shape these patterns in a person are created in their environment, which means that the affordances of that person's ecology along with the cultural behaviors exhibited by other people around them combine to shape the patterns they extract. This creates a tension between continuity and change in the patterns of behavior of members of a contextually framed group of people (i.e. who live in a particular place at a particular time and form a community). These patterns then form the substrate of types of thinking which allow us to make intuitive decisions while drawing on patterns from hundreds of thousands of memories and experiences.

Understanding the nature of symbolic pattern-based constructs, their role in human communities, and their cognitive underpinnings requires the study of several processes: a) exploring the way conceptual mental representations manifest in decision-making processes and behaviors, b) studying how people synthesize a pattern out of repeated exposures to infinitely variable stimuli, c) understanding whether intuitive problem solving and executive function connect in ways that are subject to voluntary control and awareness or not, d) identifying how our human cultures provide a framework that helps us to make sense of the extraordinary volume of experiences we process by establishing institutions of authority to triage information, and e) comparing the tendency to conserve the community's symbolic patterns with the tendency to adapt to new ecological contexts or demands made by competing identities.

These themes underly the projects I have worked on since before beginning my study of human development. I did my senior honors work as an undergraduate reviewing research and anecdotes comparing human abilities in language to the abilities of parrots, and human abilities in producing stone tools to the manual abilities of both crows and orangutans. My conclusions were that the processes underlying complex language skills like grammar and the production of an object like an Acheulian hand-axe (a type of stone tool produced by Homo erectus over a million years ago) are similar. Researchers have begun to study this hypothesis, finding support for my conjecture that Acheulian tools require a much more complex set of decisions, taking into account more judgments (e.g. angle, momentum, number of pieces that must be removed to produce a tool that will accomplish the purpose) and thus relying on the central executive is necessary for Acheulian tools but not Oldowan tools (an older, simpler typology that can be produced with fewer strokes; Stout, Hecht, Kreisheh, Bradley & Chaminade, 2015). The decisions required to produce the tool seemed to me, and now to others, as similar to the those that allow the production of a sentence, a parallel that could afford a small window into human evolution. Morgan et al. (2015) found a different parallel between language and flint-knapping: The transmission of Oldowan tool-making technology improves with explicit and intentional teaching, more so with language than with only gesture, but not with simple imitation or emulation. This finding adds another small window which raises the possibility that these two functions evolved in parallel and thus may rely on similar underlying functions and may also have co-evolved. Taken together, these findings support my undergraduate intuition that complex language abilities are connected to increasing sophistication in stone tool technologies and that both rely on the evolution of the ability to slowly accumulate the knowledge of patterns governing a series of actions so that appropriate decisions can be made to successfully achieve a complex goal.

My dissertation work was inspired by a project doing departmental assessment. I was tasked with assessing whether Introductory Psychology effectively taught students research ethics, a system of rules that they must learn to intuitively apply. After reading many brief open-ended responses where students attempted to explain the importance of institutional review boards in research conducted on human participants, I began to notice a pattern. Some students justified the need for research ethics with statements that were concerned with punishment while others were concerned with a person's need for protection from harm. At first I wondered whether this pattern of responses was tied to different levels of moral reasoning indicating individual differences in development, but then I began to wonder, given the uniquely diverse population of students at the College of Staten Island, whether the differences were associated with cultural patterns of reasoning. There was some limited initial evidence that this was so, as I identified a significant association between New Yorkers of Anglo-European heritage with the rationale of protection from harm and New Yorkers of East Asian heritage with the rationale of obedience and punishment. I began to wonder how heritage cultural values interacted with the cultural values underlying the system of ethical values being taught to them as part of training in academic psychology. The prevailing discourse about the myth of the "melting pot" of American culture claims that heritage cultures are eliminated in favor of a homogeneous "American" norm, but this would imply that education erases the values imbued in us by our families, which is problematic if true and implausible to me.

To further examine this finding, I used the context of the 2016 election to examine how predictors of voting preferences that had been identified in prior research, such as authoritarianism and sexism, contributed to voting preferences in an environment like the College of Staten Island, where there is a unique confluence of white, suburban conservatives with urban, multi-cultural New Yorkers from the other boroughs. I was interested in, for example, authoritarianism, because it provides a theoretical connection between the values of parenting practices and the values of political preferences, although it was surprisingly unrelated to any of the measures I used to evaluate cultural values. Similarly, I expected hostile sexism, another previously identified predictor of voting preferences, to be associated with cultural values. In line with prior research, I found that endorsement of hostile sexism significantly predicted a preference for Donald Trump but gender identity did not, contrary to the predictions made by prior research. This finding disassociates gender identity and hostile sexism, which I theorize stems from the fact that sexism is a cultural value based on how members of the community observe men and women being treated and portrayed as a systematic pattern. I am currently working with an undergraduate to pilot an intervention to see if observing female role models in positions of authority (such as being invited to speak at college commencements) can reduce implicit bias against women in leadership positions and reduce prejudice stemming from role incongruity (Eagly & Karau, 2002).

A new predictor I developed for my dissertation, heritage-culture individualism, significantly predicted participants' voting preference for Donald Trump over and above other validated scales measuring individual differences in endorsement of individualism and collectivism (Triandis & Gelfand, 1998; Singelis, 1994). Heritage-culture individualism can be defined as the predicted level of individualism based on the average of the levels identified in one's heritage culture(s) despite living in a community that is not in the geographical region where the heritage culture(s) emerged. The predictions were based on levels identified by Hofstede (1983). My findings suggest that the impact of heritage culture is a significant component that shapes voting decisions, and I hope they will lead other scholars to join me in investigating whether some of these predictors, such as authoritarianism and sexism, are cultural values rather than individual differences. I hope that this reframing will allow people to better understand the nature of prejudice and the challenges of changing people's attitudes towards disempowered groups.

I am currently working to develop vignettes to interrogate Americans' ideas, across specific regional cultures in the United States, about the circumstances that determine when they prioritize personal needs over the needs of a group, or over the precepts of an ideology. I regularly spend time identifying every resource I can to observe patterns in cultures, not only by reading academic findings but also by taking advantage of every opportunity I can find to interact with somebody from a different culture (including different flavors of American culture), trying to directly observe how different cultures operate in practice and constantly testing the hypotheses I have read about in the literature against these observations. Because of my dissertation, I began to wonder about some unusual patterns of differences that I have noticed between the cultural norms in communities that have been rated as high on individualism or low on individualism. Several new hypotheses are emerging from this reflection and observation, including that there are American collectivists, and that collectivism (and individualism) are poorly defined in terms of the strength of priority given to the group and the possible range in sizes of groups which collectivistic cultures prioritize. I also intend to design research to better understand if my findings regarding the lack of relationship between individualism and authoritarianism were simply inconclusive. The relationship between individualism/collectivism and authoritarianism seem likely to be linked in some way that I have not yet imagined, since the role of law and authority in cultural values concerning group organization seems inescapably important. Patricia Greenfield's ecological theory of social change and human development posits that ecological contexts will shift communities from being more individualistic to more collectivistic and vice versa. My own findings add to this theory by highlighting the resistance to change that cultural values can exhibit, as deeply embedded, implicit constructs. For example, I am curious about how different cultures across the United States negotiate the tension between America's strong individualism and the emphasis that some American communities place on the role of religion, or participation in sports teams, or the military. A recent historical/sociological book called American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America (Woodard, 2011) identifies cultural regions within the United States that are tied to cultural heritages from different European cultures, and this research could provide a framework of hypotheses to test whether the cultural parameters of different communities may have connections to the heritage cultures of generations ago. Finally, my dissertation suggests that heritage values contribute to voting preferences, so an understanding of these 11 regions may help to clarify or suggest mechanisms to reduce current polarization in American politics.

The slow development of skills is one piece of this puzzle: I have been working on a project in the field of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning since 2015 to assess the values of graduate student teachers. Over the past three years, as part of the leadership of the Graduate Student Teaching Association, I have worked to find a way to capture how novice teachers' attitudes shape the behaviors and decisions they make in their teaching practice. This research is theoretically driven but with a clear application to better serve graduate students with professional development opportunities that will help them develop their teaching abilities as they enter the professoriate. In particular, we wanted to know how experience, coursework, and professional development altered graduate students' ideas of what makes a model teacher, and we found that graduate students with no experience expected to be challenged by effectively transmitting content, whereas more experienced graduate student teachers have become increasingly concerned with how to foster deeper learning and the development of skills such as critical thinking and effective organization of information for written communication (although not at the expense of ensuring the transmission of information). I think of this as studying the pedagogical enculturation of graduate students as they acquire the teaching norms of tertiary education. My role in this endeavor has been one of leadership, bringing together a team of like-minded graduate students who each brought an idea or a scale to include in the project, resulting in a more robust project than any one of us, alone, could have achieved.

This project has not only deepened my understanding of my program of research, but also deepened my reflection on my own teaching practice as I learn to develop curriculum materials on my own. I see a common thread in the way I approach my research and my pedagogy – a process of slow-mapping, carefully curating the ecology of the classroom to create circumstances which allow student's skills to unfurl, and to help them develop skills that will serve them throughout their lifespan, while at the same time, my experiences in the classroom slowly shape my pedagogical skills. As we write up our findings, we have already collected data for the second stage in this programmatic research: We have explored novice teachers endorsement of the importance of deep learning and begun to explore whether novice teachers consider students' motivations when designing educational materials, but our findings led us to wonder about teachers' attitudes towards fostering the development of autonomy and agency. I theorize autonomy and agency to be necessary components of individualism, and I wonder about teachers' roles in shaping students' autonomy in universities where the students are culturally diverse. Very little research has examined the role of teachers' values in shaping autonomy and agency in students in tertiary academic settings. Do some American college teachers focus more than others on scaffolding autonomy and agency? Do students in classes where teachers intentionally scaffold agency become more agentic, and if so, does it help them to succeed? Future work will tie these values to learning outcomes and students' awareness of the teachers' goals and intentions.

Education and voting are not the only important applications of my interest in researching how the slow development of implicit conceptual representations occurs across domains of human cognition – it is also applicable to the study of second language acquisition and adult development of language skills. Two years ago, I began working with an international team of researchers at NYU, CUNY and from the Turkish Board of Education to create digital "care-package" interventions to support Syrian refugees living in Turkey, including an immersive, scaffolded, computer-based program to help the Arabic-speaking children learn Turkish. Studying Persian (and a little bit of Arabic) helped me anticipate these teaching challenges because I had learned to read a different alphabet, and my experience learning Spanish in an immersive environment has also given me valuable experiential insights. These insights have been guiding me in helping to design a language-learning platform which is both an active tool for supporting a disadvantaged population who have little access to effective language-learning opportunities and one further step towards understanding the slow, deep, implicit conceptual development necessary for second language acquisition. The goal of the project is to helping learners of Turkish intuit agglutinative grammatical patterns implicitly by immersive exposure to examples paired with images but without having explicit explanations. My collaboration on this project has continued as we have refined the method and are utilizing more sophisticated tools, like PsychoPy, to program a language-learning platform to explore the role of executive functions and other cognitive individual differences in the ability of adults to acquire foreign language with very different structures than their own language, just from observing and intuiting the patterns of stimuli presented to them.

Taking these findings together, I am at the beginning of a program researching how people slowly form abstract concepts such as cultural values and how these values may resist alteration even when exposed to changing ecological pressures. I want to investigate the cultural and linguistic patterns which are so robust that they pass from generation to generation, and to explore where those transmissions maintain or lose fidelity in order to both help communities preserve their cultures in an increasingly globally connected world, and also to help communities (such as my own) that wish to reshape some of their cultural values in order to reduce prejudice and discrimination.

Teaching Statement

I base my teaching philosophy on 4 pillars: Storytelling, Collaboration, Skills, and Reflection. These pillars embody my teaching goals, which are to facilitate student development of complex skills such as writing, data analysis, or studying through the use of activities which engage students, stories which captivate them, and teaching practices which have been scientifically evaluated. I have taught for four years, during which time I taught many sections of Introductory Psychology, as well as Lifespan Development, Statistics, and two versions of Experimental Psychology. I want each student to feel like the course is tailor-made to help them grow, and I achieve this by incorporating ideas from Universal Design, a paradigm for increasing accessibility in course design so that a student with disabilities does not need special accommodations, and all students benefit from the inclusiveness and thoughtful design. I also have coordinated Introductory Psychology for four years, where I was responsible for training instructors and developing and assessing course materials, giving me a different perspective on teaching.

To ensure that my teaching methodology continues to evolve and improve, I look for evidence of effectiveness in two ways: through research in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and through reflection papers. SoTL is a method of advancing best practices in higher education, through instructors engaging in evidence-based assessment of pedagogical efficacy. My first SoTL project seeded my interest in skill development and lead to my involvement with the Graduate Student Teaching Association (Div. 2, APA, Society for the Teaching of Psychology) under Professor Brooks, culminating with two years as Deputy Chair of this national organization dedicated to the support of college level instruction. My SoTL work today has expanded to collaborating with Professor Moody at CUNY College of Technology on developing tools to aid in the development of computational thinking skills. In addition to reflecting through SoTL research, I ask my students to write reflection papers: They write a letter of advice to their future peers which gives me feedback but also leads the students to reflect on their journey. Without that letter, they might not take a moment to see how far they had traveled.

My first SoTL project taught me my first lesson about student skills: Students are more likely to develop skill at studying, writing and thinking analytically when their courses are scaffolded to support skill development than when they are organized purely to transmit information. As a result, I structure course assignments in short installments, each of which is worth a small but steadily increasing percentage of the grade. Small assignments allow for more formative feedback. When teaching Introductory Psychology, I start helping students build their skills with small, low-stakes writing assignments and daily activities meant to enhance their analytical thinking skills. In Experimental Psychology, an advanced, writing-intensive course, I start students with 4-5 scientific posters (some of which are created in teams, and others as a demonstration of individual learning) as a method of scaffolding their development from novice readers of research to expert writers of research. By the time they are writing a full APA-style lab report, many of the fundamentals are internalized. One of my former students perfectly encapsulates how empowering this experience is:

"The first day of class she asked [us]... to do a poster; okay now, let me be honest I did not even know where to start… She basically came and explained it to us individually. I was amazed on how I was able to create a poster. I was proud of myself."

Female student, Summer 2017.

During this assignment students practice paraphrasing, selecting a narrative focus and strategically interpreting and selecting appropriate data to help them structure their narrative. My priority is that each assignment helps my students augment at least three separate skills: storytelling enhances study habits, helps build writing skills and lets me build rapport with students. Similarly, each activity accomplishes multiple targets. Skills are rarely employed one at a time - think of learning to speak. Children are exposed to all components of language at once and when their skills are robust enough, speech emerges.

To facilitate skill development and increase student engagement, I often present course material through stories. Stories are at the heart of social existence, which means they are at the heart of our most basic human activities, including how we learn: A memory, after all, is a personal story. Storytelling relates to the 5 APA goals for undergraduate psychology majors by helping them gain a knowledge base in psychology, think scientifically, behave ethically in a diverse world, communicate effectively and use professional tools of psychology (APA, 2013). When students collaborate, they share their experiences through stories, letting them learn vicariously through other's experiences. Humans, as Jerome Bruner points out, are designed to process and store infinite quantities of stories, and stories are designed to hold bits of information together so that they are accessible to recall. For example, psychologists studying learning processes recommend a studying technique called elaborative learning (Endres et al., 2017): In this technique, the student takes the information they are trying to remember and devises a connection between the new and the old, tying it into previous experiences. Practicing telling stories as a mode of enhancing retention and making connections helps students to build rhetorical skill and think more analytically. This, in turn, gives them a sense of confidence that they are contributing to the "story" of that field of research. They develop agency, or the sense that their voice can change the world.

Throughout the semester, I encourage students to collaborate, help each other and share their knowledge – a student who struggles with one task, like statistics, may have strong writing abilities to share. Having students collaborate achieves several goals: One is to allow me to spend one-on-one time with each student. Another is to give each student some piece of knowledge which they must teach others, giving them importance as a member of the community (inspired by Fahrenheit 451). This increases emotional and intellectual investment because their motivations are now social rather than selfish; they are no longer attending class simply to earn a grade, but also because their peers need their help, which fosters intrinsic motivation to learn. Finally, by teaching, they develop a stronger grasp of it than when passively "learning", enhancing metacognition.

Because my interests are diverse, I can work with students to help them develop their own diverse interests in many different course contexts – sometimes these collaborations excited students enough to inspire them to pursue a collaboration, something which I enjoy. For example, after teaching a class about implicit gender bias in the workplace in one of my upper-level undergraduate courses at Boston College in the spring of 2018, a student came to me and proposed a project. We have been working throughout the summer of 2018 and the current semester to examine the representation of women in the role of commencement speakers at prestigious Universities, and the way female and male students might benefit from seeing a woman lauded for her authority, power, and prestige. The purpose of this project is to encourage the BC community to submit suggestions of women who have made impressive contributions to social justice to speak at Boston College's commencement address.

I look forward to collaborating with faculty members in designing new courses, curricula, and assessments at the program in Developmental Psychology at California State University, Sacramento. I am confident in my ability to teach a broad range of undergraduate and graduate courses including, but not restricted to: Research Methods, Introductory Psychology, Adult Development, and Multicultural Issues. Coursework is an excellent context in which to help students practice their academic skills, explore narrative techniques and develop a sense of agency. For the same reasons, I look forward to mentoring students in their research projects and learning from their creative input.

I hope you find my credentials to be a good fit with your department's needs.

Teaching

2018-2019

Professor, Adult Psychology (APSY 3244)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
4 sections, 20-25 Students

2018 Fall

Professor, Child, Growth and Development (APSY 1030)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
1 section, 25-35 Students

2018 Fall

Professor, Research Methods and Analyses (APSY 2216)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
1 section, 20-30 Students

2018-2019 Spring

Professor, Family, School, and Society (APSY 1031)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course fulfilling Diversity Requirement, Boston College
3 sections, 25-35 Students

2017 Fall

Instructor, Experimental Psychology: Cognition and Perception (PSY 213)
Undergraduate Writing Intensive Course, Queens College
1 section, 20 Students

2017 Summer Fall

Instructor, Experimental Psychology: Child Development (PSY 335)
Undergraduate Capstone Course, College of Staten Island
2 sections (including summer intensive), 20 Students

2013-2016

Instructor, Introductory Psychology (PSY 100)
Undergraduate Course, College of Staten Island
3 sections, Ranging from 50-110 Students

2013-2014

Instructor, Introductory Psychology
Hybrid Undergraduate Course, College of Staten Island
2 sections, Ranging from 25-50 Students

2016 Spring

Instructor, Lifespan Development
Undergraduate Honors Course, College of Staten Island

2015 Fall

Instructor, Statistics for Social Sciences
Undergraduate Course, Queens College

Anna M. Schwartz, PhD

Developmental Psychologist

To top

Quotation I cannot thank you enough for reading my paper and providing feedback throughout. You raise many great points and counterarguments that I did not even consider before you mentioned them. I have never had the opportunity to receive feedback in this way and I think it is a great way to exchange ideas. I only wish the university structure was more similar to this. I enjoy that your questions aim to challenge me and form a bit of discomfort (which we both agree is essential to learning). I am going to have to think hard about the points you raised and do some more research.

Above all of this, I want to thank you, Anna, for stimulating the academic side of me and encouraging me to pursue new ventures. You have made me think about learning in ways I never have before. I think your approach to academia is one that many people could benefit from and I am extremely happy that I have had the pleasure to be your student for multiple semesters. You have inspired me in ways no professor has before and I cannot thank you enough for that."

Student of Child Development, 2018


Curriculum vitae

PROFESIONAL POSITIONS

2018-2020

Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology
Lynch School of Education
Boston College

EDUCATION

2018

Ph.D. in Psychology, Human Development Track
The Graduate Center at the City University of New York
Dissertation title: "Persistence of cultural heritage in a multicultural context: examining factors that shaped voting preferences in the 2016 election"
Advisor: Dr. Kristen Gillespie-Lynche

2015

M.A. in Psychology (en route)
The Graduate Center at the City University of New York
Thesis title:"Study Behaviors in Introductory Psychology Students:
Memorization and Metacognition"

Advisor: Dr. Patricia J. Brooks

2006

B.A. in Archaeology with Honors
Boston University
Independent Work for Distinction title: "From Hand to Hammer:
Evolutionary advantages of tool use and intelligence for hominids and other animals"

Advisor: Dr. Curtis Runnels

GRANTS, AWARDS, AND FELLOWSHIPS

2017-2018

Dissertation Fellowship: Committee for Interdisciplinary Science Studies
Graduate Center, City University of New York

2016-2017

Graduate Assistantship "A"
College of Staten Island, City University of New York

2011-2016

Science Fellowship
The Graduate Center, City University of New York

2015-2016

Graduate Assistantship "B"
The College of Staten Island of the City University of New York

2014-2015

Graduate Assistantship "A"
The College of Staten Island of the City University of New York

2013-2014

Graduate Assistantship "A"
The College of Staten Island of the City University of New York

2016

Doctoral Student Research Grant, What do graduate student teachers know about teaching? ($1,500)

2016

Doctoral Student Council Grant, Ninth Annual Subway Summit ($750)

2016

SAGE Teaching Innovations & Professional Development Award ($1,250)
SAGE Publications, Inc. and the Society for Teaching of Psychology

2015

Doctoral Student Council Grant, Eighth Annual Subway Summit ($750)

2013-2014

Graduate Assistantship "A" - PSY 100 Coordinator
The College of Staten Island of the City University of New York

PUBLICATIONS

BOOKS

Obeid, R., Schwartz, A.M., Shane-Simpson, C., & Brooks, P. J. (Eds.). (2017). How We Teach Now: The GSTA Guide to Student-Centered Teaching. Retrieved from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology web site: http://teachpsych.org/ebooks/howweteachnow

PEER-REVIEWED ARTICLES

Carmichael, C.L., Schwartz, A.M., Coyle, A., Goldberg, M. H. (in press). A Classroom Activity for Teaching Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development. Teaching of Psychology.

Sawyer, J. E., Obeid, R., Bublitz, D., Schwartz, A. M., Brooks, P. J., & Richmond, A. S. (2017). Which forms of active learning are most effective: Cooperative learning, writing-to-learn, multimedia instruction, or some combination?. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Psychology, 3(4), 257-271. http://doi/10.1037/stl0000095

CHAPTERS

Schwartz, A.M., Powers, K.L., Galazyn, M., Brooks, P.J. (2017). Crowdsourcing course preparation ideas to strengthen your teaching through collaboration. Retrieved from http://teachpsych.org/ebooks/howweteachnow

Brooks, P. J., Dow, E. A., Jović, S., Kreniske, P., Panjwani, A., Sawyer, J., Schwartz, A.M., Shane-Simpson, C. & Yuksel-Sokmen, P. O. (2014). Useful Books and Web sites for Developing Pedagogy in the Teaching of Psychology. Preparing the New Psychology Professoriate: Helping Graduate Students Become Competent Teachers, 2nd ed. 258-277.

Sekerina, I. A., Brooks, P. J., Campanelli, L., & Schwartz, A. (2016). Quantifier-spreading in school-age children: An eye-tracking study. Springer.

PUBLICATIONS IN PROGRESS

Schwartz, A.M., Saltzman, E.S., Whiteman, R.C., Brooks, P.J. (in progress). Endorsement of Model Teaching Criteria Among Graduate Student Instructors. Teaching of Psychology.

Schwartz, A.M., Saltzman, E.S., Moody, D. (in progress). Designing Educational Tools to Develop Computational Thinking, not Coding Literacy. GSTF Journal on Computing.

NON-PEER REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

Schwartz, A.M., Saltzman, E. and Che, E. (June, 2018). Summer Plans: Launching the New GSTA Survey!. Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Schwartz, A.M., Obeid, R., Powers, K. (May, 2018). Teaching APA Format in Experimental Psychology Through Poster Design. GSTA Blog. https://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/6205676

Schwartz, A.M., Sawyer, J., Ober, T., Che, E. (January, 2017). GSTA Talks at the 10th Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research. Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Baren, A., Schwartz, A.M., Obeid, R. (January, 2017). The GSTA at NITOP: the benefits of attending teaching conferences. Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Ober, T., Sawyer, J., Yannaco, F., Obeid, R., Schwartz, A.M. (December, 2016). GSTA Corner: Reflections on Participation in the SoTL Workshop: One Year Later. Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Obeid, R., Parshina, O., Schwartz, A.M, Whiteman, R.C. (November, 2016). GSTA Corner: Testimonials for the awesomeness of the ACT conference! Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Obeid, R., Schwartz, A.M. (October, 2016). GSTA Corner: Meet us in NYC for Our Annual Pedagogy Day! Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Obeid, R., Schwartz, A.M. (September, 2016). GSTA Corner: The GSTA at APA and Our Upcoming Events. Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Schwartz, A.M., Obeid, R. (August, 2016). GSTA Corner: Share your wisdom and insight through the GSTA’s Teaching Tips and Tricks Blog! Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Schwartz, A.M., Obeid, R. (July, 2016). GSTA Corner: Meetup at APA 2016 Denver! Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Obeid, R., Schwartz, A.M. (June, 2016). GSTA Corner: Spring Wrap-Up: What Have We Been Up To? Society for Teaching of Psychology Monthly Newsletter.

Schwartz, A.M. (April, 2016) Organization Apps as a Life Hack! Balancing Teaching with Research in Graduate School. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/3932588

Powers, K.L., Schwartz, A.M. (September, 2015) What I did this summer. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/3551696

Schwartz, A.M. (September, 2015) Red Light Green Light Index Cards. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/3526422

Schwartz, A.M. (March, 2015) Perspective of the Mentors and Mentees of 2014. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/3503568

Obeid, R., Shane-Simpson, C., Schwartz, A.M. (November, 2014) From Classroom Teaching to Teaching Research: A Getaway to Get Your Teaching Research Completed. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/3503585

Schwartz, A.M. (March, 2014) A Tool for Understanding Students: The Discussion Forum. GSTA Blog. http://teachpsych.org/page-1784686/1514994

CONFERENCES, PRESENTATIONS, AND PAPERS

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

Apr 2018

Saltzman, E., Schwartz, A.M., Whiteman, R., and Brooks, P.J. How Do Graduate Students Teach? Distinguishing Student-Centered and Teacher-Centered Approaches. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New York City.

Oct 2017

Moody, D., Schwartz, A.M., Available Educational Tools' Impact on Developing Computational Thinking. Paper presented at the International Conference on Computer Science Education: Innovation & Technology, Singapore.

Oct 2017

Rose, M.C., Schwartz, A.M., Tzuchi, T., Ober, T.M., Homer, B. D., Plass, J. L. First steps in creating a free, immersive, and adaptive computer-assisted-language-learning (CALL) program for helping refugees develop language skills. Poster session presented at the Biennial meeting of the Cognitive Development Society, Portland, OR.

Oct 2017

Schwartz, A.M., Saltzman, E., Whiteman, R.C., Brooks, P.J. Model Teaching Criteria Among Graduate Student Instructors. Symposium presented at the meeting of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology's Annual Conference on Teaching, San Antonio, TX.

May 2017

Schwartz, A.M., Shane-Simpson, C. Teaching Style Impacts Learning More Than Teaching Method or Mode. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

May 2017

Schwartz, A.M., Powers, K.L. Why is it so hard to teach critical evaluation of sources? The potential impact of emotional salience on critical consumption of media. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

May 2017

Schwartz, A.M., Guan, M. Cultural Continuity: Maintaining Culturally Influenced Moral Reasoning Styles in a Multicultural Context. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

May 2017

Whiteman, R., Schwartz, A.M., Saltzman, E., Brooks, P.J. Using TAGS to characterize approaches to teaching in graduate student instructors. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

Aug 2016

Schwartz, A.M., Ober, T., Saltzman, E., Whiteman, R.C., Obeid, R., Brooks, P.J. Promoting Student-Centered Teaching Through the Graduate Student Teaching Association. Symposium Chair at the 124th Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Denver, Colorado.

Aug 2016

Schwartz, A.M. Teaching multi-faceted psychology as a single discipline. Workshop leader at the 124th Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Denver, Colorado.

Aug 2015

Richmond, A.S., Schwartz, A.M. GSTA Invited Address: An evidence-based guide for college and university teaching: Developing model teaching characteristics Symposium Chair at the 123rd Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Canada.

May 2015

Schwartz, A.M., Richmond, A.S., Brooks, P.J. Metacognition vs. Memorization. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, New York City, NY.

Aug 2014

Sekerina, I., Brooks, P.J., Schwartz, A.M. Atypical Attention Patterns Associated with Quantifier Spreading Errors in School-Age Children. Poster session presented at the meeting of the International Association for the Study of Child Language, Amsterdam, Holland.

REGIONAL AND LOCAL

May 2016

Schwartz, A.M., Menkarious, M., Siddiqui, T. Rethinking Kohlberg's stages: Styles of moral reasoning in the contexts of gender and multiculturalism. Poster session presented at 8th Annual Research Day, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY.

Mar 2016

Shane-Simpson, C., Saltzman, E., Ober, T., Whiteman, R., Schwartz, A.M., Brooks, P.J. The collaborative course preparation as a framework for training adjunct instructors: The Peer Mentorship model. In A.M. Schwartz. (Chair), Student-Centered Pedagogy in Graduate-Student Instructors: Lessons from the Graduate Student Teaching Association. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York City, NY.

May 2015

Schwartz, A.M., Richmond, A.S., Brooks, P.J., Taher, A. Metacognition vs. Memorization: a survey. Poster session at 7th Annual Research Day, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY.

Mar 2015

Schwartz, A.M., Richmond, A.S., Brooks, P.J. (March, 2015) Metacognition: some programmatic research. Paper presented at the meeting of the Farmingdale State College Teaching of Psychology Conference, Tarrytown, NY.

Jan 2015

Schwartz, A.M., Richmond, A.S., Brooks, P.J. (March, 2015) Metacognition in Honors Students. Paper presented at 8th Annual Subway Summit, New York, NY.

May 2014

Sekerina, I., Brooks, P.J., Schwartz, A.M. Atypical Attention Patterns Associated with Quantifier Spreading Errors in School-Age Children. Poster session presented at 6th Annual Research Day, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY.

Mar 2014

Schwartz, A.M., Powers, K., Grose-Fifer, J., Davis, C., Pryiomka, K., Gillespie-Lynch, K., Obeid, R., Someki, F., Shane-Simpson, C. Bublitz, D., Brooks, P.J., Dow, E., O'Connor, M. (2014, March). Self-monitoring of study habits in an online community. In A.M. Schwartz. (Chair), Turning Teaching into Research: Examples from the GSTA. Symposium conducted at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

WORKSHOPS

Sep 2017

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Creating Lessonplans for Backwards Design Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Apr 2017

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Using Wordpress in Your Teaching Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY


Mar 2017

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Fostering the Development of Writing Skills Across the Psychology Curriculum Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Nov 2016

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Creative uses of digital technology Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Aug 2016

Workshop Attendee at GSTA workshop series
Universal Design Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Mar 2016

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Building students' writing skills through low stakes assignments and peer feedback Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Nov 2015

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Fostering a Growth Mindset Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Sep 2015

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Fostering Good Study Habits Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Sep 2015

Invited Teaching Activities Discussant for Teaching of Psychology Course Graduate Course, The Graduate Center, CUNY

Sep 2015

Devices for Studying Psychology
Session at Fostering Good Study Habits Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Sep 2015

Persuading Students to Improve their Habits
Session at Fostering Good Study Habits Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Aug 2015

Workshop organizer at GSTA workshop series
Achieving Total Student Participation Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Aug 2015

Index cards: How simple tools can be used creatively to structure engaged learning activities
Session at Achieving Total Student Participation Pedagogy Workshop
The Graduate Center, CUNY

Oct 2014

Mentee
Workshop on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
STP Annual Conference on Teaching (ACT)
Atlanta, Georgia

TEACHING AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

TEACHING

2018-2019

Professor, Adult Psychology (APSY 3244)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
4 sections, 20-25 Students

2018
Fall

Professor, Child, Growth and Development (APSY 1030)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
1 section, 25-35 Students

2018
Fall

Professor, Research Methods and Analyses (APSY 2216)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course, Boston College
1 section, 20-30 Students

2018-2019
Spring

Professor, Family, School, and Society (APSY 1031)
Undergraduate Developmental Psychology Course fulfilling Diversity Requirement, Boston College
3 sections, 25-35 Students

2017
Fall

Instructor, Experimental Psychology: Cognition and Perception (PSY 213)
Undergraduate Writing Intensive Course, Queens College
1 section, 20 Students

2017
Summer-Fall

Instructor, Experimental Psychology: Child Development (PSY 335)
Undergraduate Capstone Course, College of Staten Island
2 sections (including summer intensive), 20 Students

2013-2016

Instructor, Introductory Psychology (PSY 100)
Undergraduate Course, College of Staten Island
3 sections, Ranging from 50-110 Students

2013-2014

Instructor, Introductory Psychology
Hybrid Undergraduate Course, College of Staten Island
2 sections, Ranging from 25-50 Students

2016
Spring

Instructor, Lifespan Development
Undergraduate Honors Course, College of Staten Island

2015
Fall

Instructor, Statistics for Social Sciences
Undergraduate Course, Queens College

NON-TEACHING

2017

Tour Guide
Big Onion Walking Tours (Historical tour guides)

2015-2017

International Field School Co-Coordinator
Fundación Instituto de Investigación de Prehistoria y Evolución Humana

2015-2016

Advanced Placement Reading in Psychology
The College Board

2013-2017

Introductory Psychology Course Coordinator
The College of Staten Island

2006-2008

General Merchandise Floor Supervisor
Barnes & Noble College Bookstores

2001

Head Choreographer for Dept. of Theater
Buck's Rock Creative Arts Camp

UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING - STUDENT RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

Spring 2018

McGrath, K.
The development of adult-like cognition, belief change and critical thinking in undergraduates’ media literacy.
Supervision of Independent Study
Research Project in process, Boston, MA

Fall 2018

Carroll, K.
The importance (and dearth) of female role models in leadership positions: a case for female commencement speakers at Boston College.
Supervision of Independent Study
Newspaper Op Ed, Boston, MA

Jan 2017

Guan, M.
Broadening our class discussions of research ethics in multi-cultural contexts.
Poster at the 10th Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Educational Research, New York, NY

Apr 2016

Menkarious, M., Siddiqui, T.
Rethinking Kohlberg’s stages: Styles of moral reasoning in the contexts of gender and multiculturalism.
Poster at CSI Undergraduate Conference on Research, Scholarship, and Performance, Staten Island, NY

May 2015

Taher, A.
Metacognition vs. Memorization: a survey.
Poster session at 7th Annual Research Day, The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY.

RECORD OF SERVICE

INTERNATIONAL

2016-2018

Project Hope – A Digital Care Package for Syrian Refugees in Turkey
Digital Immersive Language Learning System for Learners of Turkish
CREATE Lab, New York University

NATIONAL

2016-2017

Graduate Student Teaching Association Deputy Chair

2016-2017

State Advocacy Coordinator for New York State
Advocacy Coordination Team
APA Graduate Students (APAGS)

2015

Campus Representative for CUNY
Advocacy Coordination Team
APA Graduate Students (APAGS)

2015-2017

Pedagogy Workshop Series Coordinator
Graduate Student Teaching Association,
Society for the Teaching of Psychology,
Division 2, American Psychological Association

2014-2017

Mentorship Program Chair
Peer Mentorship Program
Graduate Student Teaching Association,
Society for the Teaching of Psychology,
Division 2, American Psychological Association

2014-2017

Peer Mentor
Peer Mentorship Program
Graduate Student Teaching Association,
Society for the Teaching of Psychology,
Division 2, American Psychological Association

2013

Member-at-large
Graduate Student Teaching Association,
Society for the Teaching of Psychology,
Division 2, American Psychological Association

LOCAL

2016

Conference Co-Chair
Pedagogy Day: 7th Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2016

Conference Co-Chair
9th Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Educational Research
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2015

Conference Co-Chair
8th Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Educational Research
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2015

Planning Committee
Pedagogy Day: 6th Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2014

Activity Blitz Co-Chair
Pedagogy Day: 5th Annual Conference on the Teaching of Psychology
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2009

Assistant Teacher (adult literacy/ESOL III)
Haitian Multi-Service Community Center, Catholic Charities of Boston

2008-2009

After-school tutoring services for city public schools’ pupils Tutor
Champion Learning, New York City

UNIVERSITY

2018

Committee on Curriculum change, Boston College LSOE
Subcommittee for developing learning objectives to coordinate the teaching of Adult Psychology and Adolescent Psychology core curriculum
Boston College LSOE

2018

Committee on Curriculum change
Subcommittee for developing learning objectives to coordinate Research Methods and Statistics Core Curriculum
Boston College LSOE

2016-2017

Psychology Executive Committee,
College of Staten Island Student Representative
The Graduate Center, CUNY

2012-2014

Human Development Coordination Committee
Second Year Student Representative
Psychology Department
The Graduate Center, CUNY

RESEARCH AND CONSULTING

2016-2018

Creating a language learning platform using Psychopy to evaluate the acquisition of Turkish language learner’s comprehension and production of agglutinative grammatical constructions.

2017

Educational Assessment: Teaching Kohlberg's stages of moral reasoning through analyzing comments under the Youtube video of Eric Garner’s death.

2017

Educational Assessment: Learning to Code: Using art-based environments to help students to express creativity through computer programming.

2017

Educational Assessment: How do student's learn to understand research concepts of reliability and validity through dissecting "IQ tests"?

2016

Consultant for supplemental Interactive and Video Materials
Norton Publishing Company

2015

Departmental Assessment: Psychological Ethics in CUNY Pathways, Middle States Accredited, and General Education Coursework

2010-2011

Project Coordinator
Improving Writing Skills in College Students
Boston University

2009-2011

Research Assistant
AVIAN Learning Experiment – Pepperberg Lab
Brandeis University

2007-2010

Lab Supervisor, Field Supervisor
El-Hemmeh Archaeological Excavation
Harvard University

2008-2014

Excavator and Lab Technician
Cueva de Angel Archaeological Excavation
Lucena, Spain

2006-2007

Lab Technician
Stone Age Lab
Harvard University

2008

Lab Technician
Zooarchaeology Lab
Harvard University

2005

Excavator
Castell Henllys Excavation
York University

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP


Quotation I think you are extremely approachable and supportive. I have needed help multiple times which you have taken great time & consideration to help me with. I thought the exam was well-worded and tested concepts well. I will be honest when saying I don't love the material (but that is typical of stats haha) but I do like the class. I feel like I am learning a lot in the class and find the APA teachings super helpful for future classes as well."

Student of Research Methods, 2018

Quotation I think that you have been organized during your lectures and have been very helpful to me. You have been very supportive of me and my hard schedule. I feel that you understand me as a student athlete here and give me the opportunities that I need. I like that you take the time to sit down with your students and also hold us accountable. I like the material that you have taught us this far because to me it is very interesting. I have learned that communication is easier than it looks, and that this class has helped me reach out for help for other classes."

Student of Adult Psychology, 2018